2003 XiaGuan "Jia Ji" (1st Grade) Tuo 100g Puerh Sheng Cha Raw Tea - King Tea Mall
2003 XiaGuan "Jia Ji" (1st Grade) Tuo 100g Puerh Sheng Cha Raw Tea - King Tea Mall
2003 XiaGuan "Jia Ji" (1st Grade) Tuo 100g Puerh Sheng Cha Raw Tea - King Tea Mall
2003 XiaGuan "Jia Ji" (1st Grade) Tuo 100g Puerh Sheng Cha Raw Tea - King Tea Mall
2003 XiaGuan "Jia Ji" (1st Grade) Tuo 100g Puerh Sheng Cha Raw Tea - King Tea Mall
2003 XiaGuan "Jia Ji" (1st Grade) Tuo 100g Puerh Sheng Cha Raw Tea - King Tea Mall
2003 XiaGuan "Jia Ji" (1st Grade) Tuo 100g Puerh Sheng Cha Raw Tea - King Tea Mall

2003 XiaGuan "Jia Ji" (1st Grade) Tuo 100g Puerh Sheng Cha Raw Tea

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Using high quality sun dried tea materials. 

Long tea threads with clear silver tea hairs. 

Golden tea liquor with honey like fragrance. 

Sweet, mellow, thick and smooth. 

Some aged tea characters come out. 

Well recommended for daily drinking. 

Storage:

Guangzhou natural storage.

It varies on paper tong package which contains 5 separated tuo of 100g in each or individual paper box which contains 100g tuo. 

 

Background: 

"Te Tuo" (特沱): an abbreviation of "Te Ji Tuo Cha"(特级沱茶), directly means "Special Grade Tuo Cha" made from special grade tea leaf (high ratio of tiny buds and young leave)

"Jia Tuo" (甲沱): an abbreviation of "Jia Ji Tuo Cha"(甲级沱茶), directly means "1st Grade Tuo Cha" made from 1st grade tea leaf (high ratio of young and large leave)

"Yi Ji Tuo Cha" (乙级沱茶):   directly means "2nd Grade Tuo Cha" made from 2nd grade tea leaf (high ratio of large and strong tea leave)

"Bing Ji Tuo Cha" (丙级沱茶):   directly means "3rd Grade Tuo Cha" made from 3rd grade tea leaf (high ratio of strong tea leave and stems)

"Da Zhong Tuo Cha" (大众沱茶):   directly means "4th Grade Tuo Cha" made from 4th grade tea leaf (high ratio of rough tea leave and stems)

Customer Reviews

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J
Jakub Tomek
A classic for a reason

This is a well-known tuocha and it's clear to see why. The Jia Ji tuochas went downhill from 2004, and the 2003 year is in my view also better than 2001. (didn't have 2002).

It's a very rich and complex tea, with a hint of smoke mixed with fruitiness (dried longan) and spice; a bit of honey-like sweetness sometimes comes through, but overall the tea is not as warm in character as a Menghai or Wuyi tea of this age might be.

If there is a weakness, I would say the tea is not mega-exciting outside its taste - be it vibrant mouthfeel, or what is termed qi - neither seems particularly strong.

Overall, definitely recommended.

A
Adam Bardos
2003 Jia Ji

Next to 2004 pink box, my favourite Xiaguan/sheng/tea. Mellow, sweet, not that xiaguan-strong. If I could buy only 1 type of tea, this would be The One.